RSSAll Entries in the "Research/Study" Category

New Research Finds No Gender Difference in Innate Mathematical Ability

New Research Finds No Gender Difference in Innate Mathematical Ability

A new study from the University of Chicago has found that there is no difference in the ability to process numbers between young boys and girls. This contradicts the stereotype that boys are innately superior in math and science.

Georgetown University Computer Science Professor Mines #MeToo Movement Data

Georgetown University Computer Science Professor Mines #MeToo Movement Data

The data, mined by a research team at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., found that there have been more than 8.1 million tweets containing #MeToo to date and most tweets were more negative than positive. The project was led by Lisa Singh, a professor of computer science at the university.

New York University Researchers Develop Tool to Help Transgender Women Have a More "Feminine" Voice

New York University Researchers Develop Tool to Help Transgender Women Have a More “Feminine” Voice

A New York University study suggests biofeedback may be used as a tool to help trans women achieve a voice they are comfortable with.

Educated Women Are More Likely to Get Married and Stay Married Than Women With Less Education

Educated Women Are More Likely to Get Married and Stay Married Than Women With Less Education

Dr. Yue Qian of the University of British Columbia found that the proportion of marriages in which the husband had a higher level of education than his spouse dropped from 24 percent to 15 percent and marriages in which the wife had more education rose from 22 percent to 29 percent between 1980 and 2012. Women with a higher level of education were more likely to get, and stay, married.

Study Examines Obstacles Faced by Women Aspiring to Be CEOs in America

Study Examines Obstacles Faced by Women Aspiring to Be CEOs in America

A new study led by researchers at Florida State University has found that women CEOs in America are paid less, have shorter tenures, and are less likely to serve as chair of the board for their firms. The analysis also found that companies led by a woman do not do as well in the stock […]

Ohio State University Study Finds Strong Relationships With Fathers Helps Daughters Overcome Loneliness

Ohio State University Study Finds Strong Relationships With Fathers Helps Daughters Overcome Loneliness

In a new study, researchers from Ohio State University have found that loneliness was much less prevalent for young girls who had strong relationships with their fathers. The study also found that parent-child closeness did not have an effect on young boys’ level of loneliness

How Giving Women the Right to Vote Boosted Educational Attainment in the United States

How Giving Women the Right to Vote Boosted Educational Attainment in the United States

A new study from the National Bureau of Economic Research authored by a group of three women economists, has found that women’s suffrage contributed to an increased retention rate of children in schools. The results showed that education expenditures rose 9 percent in local schools after women got the right to vote.

Study Finds the Wage Penalty for Working Mothers Evaporates for Single Mothers

Study Finds the Wage Penalty for Working Mothers Evaporates for Single Mothers

Previous research has shown that in the United States, working mothers are subject to a net wage penalty of 5 to 7 percent per child. But a new study led by a sociologist at the University of Arizona found that single mothers are not penalized at work in the same way that occurs for married mothers.

Babies of Pregnant Women With Depression or Anxiety Have Lower Development of White Matter in Their Brains

Babies of Pregnant Women With Depression or Anxiety Have Lower Development of White Matter in Their Brains

The University of Wisconsin researchers found that babies who had mothers with higher levels of anxiety and depression had less developed white matter in their brains. White matter helps the brain process information quickly and forms connections between areas of the brain.

Study Finds That the Math Gender Gap in Ninth Grade Is Large But It Expands Further As Girls Get Older

Study Finds That the Math Gender Gap in Ninth Grade Is Large But It Expands Further As Girls Get Older

The study by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Pennsylvania, found that of the top 5,000 ninth graders in the American Mathematics Competitions, only 30 percent were female. In the top 500, 18 percent were female and in the top 50, 8 percent were female.

Researchers Discover Gender Differences in the Neurological Processing of Motion

Researchers Discover Gender Differences in the Neurological Processing of Motion

The study found that both males and females are very quick at reporting which direction black and white bars move on a screen. On average, respondents required only a tenth of second or less to respond, but women took between 25 to 75 percent longer to respond than men.

Iowa State University Study Finds Persisting Gender Stereotypes Impact Voting Behavior

Iowa State University Study Finds Persisting Gender Stereotypes Impact Voting Behavior

The study found that when there was only one woman on the ballot, participants were just as likely to vote for her as the male candidate, however, when another woman was added, the woman lower on the ballot had more negative evaluations and received less votes.

Howard University Makes Great Strides in Gender Diversity in Engineering

Howard University Makes Great Strides in Gender Diversity in Engineering

At the College of Engineering and Architecture at Howard University, 43 percent of students who earned engineering degrees in 2016 were women. This is more than double the national average. The percentage of women assistant professors in the college increased from 9 percent in 2015 to 39 percent today.

New Academic Study Finds That Inducing Early Labor May Help Mother and Baby

New Academic Study Finds That Inducing Early Labor May Help Mother and Baby

The study included more than 6,1000 first-time mothers at 41 hospitals. For women who chose to induce, labor 18.6 percent had cesarean sections compared to 22.2 percent of women who were not induced. Based on this data, researchers estimate that inducing labor at 39 weeks could eliminate the need for one C-section for every 28 deliveries.

Moms Matter: UCLA Study Finds College-Age Children Place Their Parents Ahead of Their Friends

Moms Matter: UCLA Study Finds College-Age Children Place Their Parents Ahead of Their Friends

A new study by psychologists at the University of California, Los Angeles finds that college-age children tend to place more importance on the well-being of their mothers and fathers than on their friends.

CDC Reports Shows the Extent the Opioid Epidemic Impacts Mothers and Their Babies

CDC Reports Shows the Extent the Opioid Epidemic Impacts Mothers and Their Babies

The new study shows that the number of pregnant women with opioid use disorder quadrupled between 1999 and 2014. Researchers found that the national prevalence rate of opioid increased from 1.5 per 1,000 delivery hospitalizations in 1999 to 6.5 in 2014.

Gender Diversity Is Not a Star in the Hollywood Film Industry

Gender Diversity Is Not a Star in the Hollywood Film Industry

A study led by Stacy L. Smith, an associate professor of journalism and communication at the University of Southern California, finds that women made up just 31.8 percent of the speaking roles in the 100 top-grossing films of 2017. Women were 7.3 percent of the directors, 10.1 percent of the lead writers, and less than one percent of the composers.

How Mentors Can Help Women College Athletes Succeed

How Mentors Can Help Women College Athletes Succeed

The results of a study conducted at the University of Kansas showed that when mentors instill self-esteem and the idea that the students’ lives matter to others, it can boost athletic ability, provide opportunities for leadership and leave a positive effect on women’s continued involvement in sports.

Study Finds That Women Heart Attack Victims Are More Likely to Survive If Treated by a Woman Doctor

Study Finds That Women Heart Attack Victims Are More Likely to Survive If Treated by a Woman Doctor

A new study by researchers at the business schools of the University of Minnesota, Washington University in St. Louis, and Harvard University also found that male physicians who have a large number of female colleagues or who have treated a large number of female heart attack patients have better success rates with female heart attack patients.

AAUW Study Examines the Gender Gap in Nonprofit Organizations, Including Higher Education

AAUW Study Examines the Gender Gap in Nonprofit Organizations, Including Higher Education

Women have made up a majority of all college graduates in each of the past 35 years. But today women are only 44 percent of tenured faculty and 36 percent of full professors. Women are less than 30 percent of college presidents and only 32 percent of the members of the boards of trustees at colleges and universities.

Survey Offers Clues on the Persisting Gender Gap in Top Positions at the Nation's Leading Law Firms

Survey Offers Clues on the Persisting Gender Gap in Top Positions at the Nation’s Leading Law Firms

In 2016, women surpassed men in law school enrollments for the first time. But women still have a long way to go to reach equality at the top levels of the American legal profession. A new study offers some possible reasons why women tend to leave the profession before they make it to the top ranks.

Yale University Study Documents How Title IX Complaints Have Changed Over the Years

Yale University Study Documents How Title IX Complaints Have Changed Over the Years

The data shows that complaints citing discrimination in academics were the most common type filed for nearly all of the last 20 years, while athletics complaints were the least commonly filed. Complaints alleging schools violated the law by mishandling sexual harassment began to rise in 2006, skyrocketing in 2009.

Medical Schools That Are Doing Their Part to Close the Gender Gap in Faculty Ranks

Medical Schools That Are Doing Their Part to Close the Gender Gap in Faculty Ranks

The average percentage of women among all new faculty hires at U.S. medical schools for the three-year period beginning in the fall of 2013 to the spring of 2016 was 47 percent. At six medical schools, women made up at least 60 percent of new hires. But at 27 medical schools, women were less than 40 percent of new faculty hires.

Stanford University Study Examines Why Some Women Avoid the Spotlight at Work

Stanford University Study Examines Why Some Women Avoid the Spotlight at Work

In interviews with a large group of women who participated in a women’s professional development program operated by a nonprofit organization, researchers found that many of these women chose a workplace strategy that they named “intentional invisibility,” that was risk averse and avoided conflicts.

Iowa State University Researcher Examines Women's Reactions to "Benevolent Sexism"

Iowa State University Researcher Examines Women’s Reactions to “Benevolent Sexism”

Dr. Pelin Gul and Tom Kupfer note that some women like it when men open doors for them or pick up the dinner check on a date. But other women find such practices insulting and sexist. The research found that women prefer men to be benevolent but they also determined that women did recognize the potential harm.

The Gender Gap in Medical School Faculty Ranks Is Slowly Narrowing

The Gender Gap in Medical School Faculty Ranks Is Slowly Narrowing

Data from the American Association of Medical Colleges shows that women are making slow progress toward equality in faculty ranks at U.S. medical schools. Overall, women make up close to 41 percent of all faculty members but they are only 23.9 percent of all full professors.

In the Twitter Universe of Washington Journalists, Women Tend to Be Ignored

In the Twitter Universe of Washington Journalists, Women Tend to Be Ignored

A new study led by Nikki Usher, an associate professor in the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University, finds that male journalists were three times as likely to retweet posts made by other men than to retweet posts by women journalists.

Study Finds College Age Women Who Use Alcohol and Marijuana Far More Likely to Engage in Unsafe Sex

Study Finds College Age Women Who Use Alcohol and Marijuana Far More Likely to Engage in Unsafe Sex

The study, led by Jumi Hayaki, an associate professor of psychology at the College of the Holy Cross, found that when young women drank alcohol and smoked marijuana on the same day, they were more than three times as likely to have unprotected sex than on days when they neither drank or smoked pot.

The Gender Gap in Medical School Enrollments Is Disappearing

The Gender Gap in Medical School Enrollments Is Disappearing

New data from the Association of American Medical Colleges shows that during the 2017-18 academic year, there were 43,571 women enrolled in U.S. medical schools and 46,571 men. In 2017, for the first time in history, women outnumbered men as first-year medical school matriculants.

Women Scientists Receive More Negative Comments on YouTube Than Men

Women Scientists Receive More Negative Comments on YouTube Than Men

The data showed that 14 percent of the comments posted on videos made by women were critical, compared to just six percent for men. Nearly 5 percent of comments were related to the woman’s appearance. Only 1.4 percent of the comments on men’s videos were related to appearance.

A Report Card on University Performance on Hiring Women Coaches for Women's Athletic Teams

A Report Card on University Performance on Hiring Women Coaches for Women’s Athletic Teams

Nationwide, women were 41. 5 percent of all head coaches of women’s teams at 86 colleges and universities that were members of seven major athletic conferences. The percentage varied greatly by sport. For example, 95.7 percent of field hockey coaches were women but there were no women head coaches in triathlon or alpine skiing.

Study at Cornell University Finds That Scholars More Apt to Refer to Men by Using Only Their Last Name

Study at Cornell University Finds That Scholars More Apt to Refer to Men by Using Only Their Last Name

Study participants were more than twice as likely to call male professionals – even fictional ones – by their last name only, compared to equivalent female professionals. For example, Charles Darwin is often referred to simply as Darwin. But Marie Curie is rarely referred to simply as Curie.

New Report Reveals Gender Differences in Occupations Four Years After College

New Report Reveals Gender Differences in Occupations Four Years After College

A new report from the U.S. Department of Education finds that only 4.6 percent of women who graduated from college in 2008 were employed in STEM fields in 2012. For men the figure was 20.0 percent.

Harvard University Study Assesses Cancer Risk for Flight Attendants

Harvard University Study Assesses Cancer Risk for Flight Attendants

A new study by researchers at the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University presents evidence that airline flight attendants have higher rates of several types of cancer including breast, uterine, and cervical cancer. More than three quarters of all flight attendants in the United States are women.

A New Study by Three Women Scholars Shows Why the Gender Gap in Physics Matters

A New Study by Three Women Scholars Shows Why the Gender Gap in Physics Matters

The authors state that “women are especially underrepresented in physics because of a complex interaction of factors, including an unusually chilly climate for women, worse policies and resources for female faculty, and pervasive cultural stereotypes about the inaccessibility and masculine nature of physics.”