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Women Continue to Hold a Large Lead in Seeking Access to Higher Education

Women Continue to Hold a Large Lead in Seeking Access to Higher Education

New data from the U.S. Department of Education shows that women still are seeking to access higher education at rates far higher than men. In 2016, 5,829,088 women applied to four-year colleges and universities in the United States, compared to 4,504,453 men.

Why the Gender Makeup of the Nursing Profession Is Changing

Why the Gender Makeup of the Nursing Profession Is Changing

The study, published by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and authored by economists at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Louisville, finds that from 1960 to 2013, the percentage of men among all registered nurses rose from 2.2 percent to 13 percent.

Study Finds That Highly Educated New Parents Do Not Equally Share Household Chores

Study Finds That Highly Educated New Parents Do Not Equally Share Household Chores

In the study of highly educated, two-earner couples who were having their first child, men spent about twice the amount of time engaged in leisure activities as their spouse in the period three months after the birth of their child.

The Gender Gap in Graduate Degree Awards Varies Greatly by Particular Discipline

The Gender Gap in Graduate Degree Awards Varies Greatly by Particular Discipline

Women made up more than three quarters of all master’s degree recipients in education, public administration, and the health sciences. However women were less than one third of all master’s degree recipients in engineering and mathematics and computer science. There were similar gender gaps in doctoral awards.

Careers of Women Faculty Members Are Burdened by "Academic Housekeeping" Chores

Careers of Women Faculty Members Are Burdened by “Academic Housekeeping” Chores

Research by Cassandra Guarino, professor of education and public policy at the University of California, Riverside, finds that women faculty members continue to disproportionately serve on committees and handle departmental administrative duties.

Rutgers University Scholar Examining Whether There Are Gender Differences in Concussions

Rutgers University Scholar Examining Whether There Are Gender Differences in Concussions

Carrie Esopenko, an assistant professor in the department of rehabilitation and movement science at Rutgers University in New Jersey is conducting research on whether there are gender differences in concussions, recovery time from such injuries, and the psychological effects of concussions on women.

Examining the Data on Enrollments of Women in U.S. Graduate Schools

Examining the Data on Enrollments of Women in U.S. Graduate Schools

A new report from the Council on Graduate Schools finds that in 2016 there were 1,045,500 women students enrolled in U.S. graduate schools. They made up 57.5 percent of all enrollments. But women were less than 40 percent of all graduate students in engineering, mathematics and computer science, and physical sciences.

Women Are Making Progress at Schools With Large Numbers of STEM Graduates

Women Are Making Progress at Schools With Large Numbers of STEM Graduates

A new study by the labor market analytics firm Emsi and published in The Wall Street Journal finds that at nine of the 10 universities with the largest number of degree earners in STEM fields, women made gains from 2012 to 2016. At six of these 10 schools women earned at least one third of all STEM degrees.

New Report Examines the Status of Single Mothers in Higher Education

New Report Examines the Status of Single Mothers in Higher Education

The number of single mothers enrolled in high education is growing both in absolute numbers and in their percentage of the total student population. However, these women face significant financial obstacles as well as time constraints that make it difficult for them to persist in higher education.

New Data on Poverty in the United States Shows a Continuing Gender Gap

New Data on Poverty in the United States Shows a Continuing Gender Gap

In 2016, 14.8 percent of all women and girls in the United States lived in poverty. For all males, the poverty rate was 12.2 percent. The good news is that the poverty rate for women and girls dropped from 16.3 percent in 2012 to 14.8 percent in 2016.

How Student Debt Impacts Career and Life Choices of New Women Attorneys

How Student Debt Impacts Career and Life Choices of New Women Attorneys

In a National Bureau of Economic Research study by scholars at the University of Pennsylvania and Ryerson University in Toronto, the authors found that women with more student debt stay longer in private-sector jobs, postpone marriage, marry men with lower earnings and delay childbearing.

Study Examines the Gender Wage Gap for Faculty at Public Universities

Study Examines the Gender Wage Gap for Faculty at Public Universities

The study determined that on average, women earned $23,000 less than men. The authors found that wage gaps were largely due to three factors: amount of work experience, research productivity and field of expertise. The gender wage is driven predominantly by underrepresentation in science and math intensive fields.

New Census Data Shows a Persisting Major Gender Gap in Median Income in the United States

New Census Data Shows a Persisting Major Gender Gap in Median Income in the United States

The median income of households headed by a single woman in the United States in 2016 was $41,027. For households headed by a single man in 2016, the median income figure was $58,057. The good news is that the gender gap in median income grew a bit smaller from 2015 to 2016.

How the Practice of 'Brideprice' Contributes to International Terrorism

How the Practice of ‘Brideprice’ Contributes to International Terrorism

Widespread in several African nations as well as the Middle East and Asia, the custom of brideprice involves the groom paying the bride’s family for the expenses they incurred while raising her. Men’s inability to pay brideprice leads many of them to join rebel or terrorist groups, say the authors of a new study.

Scholarly Study Finds a Possible Contributing Factor to the High Maternal Mortality Rate in the United States

Scholarly Study Finds a Possible Contributing Factor to the High Maternal Mortality Rate in the United States

Researchers surveyed a large group of postpartum nurses in hospitals across the country. All respondents were members of the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses. The researchers found that many of these nurses were not properly informed of the dangers mother face after giving birth

The Gender Gap Among Degree Recipients in Humanities Disciplines

The Gender Gap Among Degree Recipients in Humanities Disciplines

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences finds that in 2015, women earned 61.7 percent of all associate’s degrees in humanities fields. The percentage of women among associate’s degree recipients in the humanities has remained largely unchanged since 1989. Women also made up 61 percent of all recipients of bachelor’s degrees in the humanities.

Women Outscore Men on the ACT College Entrance Examination

Women Outscore Men on the ACT College Entrance Examination

The annual report on college readiness issued by the American College Testing Program shows that for the first time in history, young women, on average, scored higher than men on the ACT college entrance examination. On the ACT scoring scale of 1 to 36, the average score of women was 21.1, compared to 21.0 for men.

Women With Bulimia Have Different Neural Reactions When They Are Shown Pictures of Food

Women With Bulimia Have Different Neural Reactions When They Are Shown Pictures of Food

Brain scans of women bulimics showed decreased blood flow in the precuneus, the area of the brain responsible for self-reflection, when the women were shown pictures of high-sugar and high-fat foods. Women without bulimia had increased blood flow to the same neural region when shown the identical photographs.

Study Finds That the 35 Highest-Paid Employees of the University of California Are All Men

Study Finds That the 35 Highest-Paid Employees of the University of California Are All Men

An analysis of state records conducted by the Sacramento Bee newspaper found that of the 35 people employed by the University of California System who make more than $1 million annually, all 35 are men.

How "Marrying Down" Impacts the Standard of Living of Educated Women

How “Marrying Down” Impacts the Standard of Living of Educated Women

Although women have greatly increased their earnings power through higher education, the overall standard of living for women in married-couple families has not increased because many women are “marrying down” with husbands who are less educated and who earn less money than themselves.

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Study Seeks to End Racial Disparity in Breast Cancer Survival Rates

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Study Seeks to End Racial Disparity in Breast Cancer Survival Rates

A new research project led by Alice Yan at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee seeks to determine if a program aimed at increasing exercise among women who have had breast cancer can contribute to a reduction in the racial disparity in breast cancer survival rates.

Examining the Gender Gap in Bachelor Degree Awards in Various Disciplines

Examining the Gender Gap in Bachelor Degree Awards in Various Disciplines

A new study by the American Enterprise Institute found that that women make up a huge percentage of all degree earners in some fields and very few in others. For example, women made up 87 percent of all bachelor’s degree earners in the field of family and consumer sciences but only 18 percent in computer science.

For Students Good at Math, Women Are Less Likely Than Men to Have Confidence in Their Abilities

For Students Good at Math, Women Are Less Likely Than Men to Have Confidence in Their Abilities

A new analysis by a professor of behavioral science and a research scientist in behavioral economics at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago, finds that women who are good at mathematics are less likely to have confidence in their abilities than men who are good at mathematics.

Duke University Research Finds Women Do Not Have Prominent Roles in Many Films

Duke University Research Finds Women Do Not Have Prominent Roles in Many Films

To pass the Bechdel test, a movie must satisfy three basic requirements: it must have at least two named women in it, they must talk to each other, and their conversation must be about something other than a man. More than 40 percent of all Hollywood films don’t pass the test.

How MIT Closed the Gender Gap in Mechanical Engineering

How MIT Closed the Gender Gap in Mechanical Engineering

According to the American Society for Engineering Education, only 13.2 percent of all bachelor’s degrees awarded in mechanical engineering in 2015 were earned by women. But at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 49.5 percent of all undergraduate majors in mechanical engineering are women.

Website Ranks the Top College and University Computer Science Programs for Women

Website Ranks the Top College and University Computer Science Programs for Women

The website StudySoup.com examined the top-ranked U.S. universities for computer science to see which are also offering an inclusive environment for female students looking to enter into the industry. Harvey Mudd College, Dartmouth College, and Harvard University were the top three.

UCSF-Led Study Finds Pregnant Women's Exposure to Flame Retardants Leads to Lower IQ in Their Babies

UCSF-Led Study Finds Pregnant Women’s Exposure to Flame Retardants Leads to Lower IQ in Their Babies

In an important study led by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco, it was found that pregnant women who had high exposure to flame retardants tended to have children with lower levels of intelligence. Flame retardants are commonly found in furniture and other household products.

Montana State Research Projects Shows Grant-Writing Seminars for Women Can Make a Difference

Montana State Research Projects Shows Grant-Writing Seminars for Women Can Make a Difference

New research by a group of women scholars at Montana State University found that a six-week grant writing boot camp conducted by the university’s ADVANCE Project TRACS program resulted in a four-fold positive effect on women winning grants.

Examining Why Women Are So Scarce in Composing Music for Film

Examining Why Women Are So Scarce in Composing Music for Film

In a survey of a large number of screen composers, 67 percent of women composers agreed with the statement that “gender discrimination is common in the industry.” Only 32 percent of male composers agreed.

Negative Campaign Attacks May Hurt Women Candidates More Than Their Male Counterparts

Negative Campaign Attacks May Hurt Women Candidates More Than Their Male Counterparts

A new study by political scientists at West Virginia University and Tulane University in New Orleans, finds that negative campaign advertisements tended to do more damage to women candidates, particularly Democrats, than to male candidates.

University of Southern California Study Examines the Gender Gap in the Film Industry

University of Southern California Study Examines the Gender Gap in the Film Industry

In the top 100 grossing films of 2016, women and girls were only 31.4 percent of the actors who had speaking roles. More than a quarter of these 100 films had some nudity of women, while only 9.2 percent had some nudity of male characters.

New Advanced Placement Course Provides a Huge Boost to Women in Computer Science

New Advanced Placement Course Provides a Huge Boost to Women in Computer Science

The data shows that in 2016, 12,642 women took a computer science Advanced Placement examination. With the introduction of AP Computer Science Principles, the number of women taking a computer science Advancement Placement test rose to 29,708 in 2017.

Women-Owned Employer Firms Show Only Slight Growth

Women-Owned Employer Firms Show Only Slight Growth

In 2015, there were 1.1 million women-owned employer firms in the United States. These women-owned firms had total sales of $1.353 billion. This was up only slightly from 2014.

Women With Doctorates "Get No Respect"

Women With Doctorates “Get No Respect”

Researchers found that when women introduced male speakers at two major medical gatherings, they referred to the speaker as “Dr.” 95 percent of the time. But when men introduced women speakers, they referred to the speaker as “Dr.” only 49 percent of the time.

University of Tennessee

University Study Finds Adverse Psychological Effects for Women Who Work in “Breastaurants”

A new study led by Dawn Szymanski, a professor at the University of Tennessee, has determined that women who work in restaurants that require the wait staff to wear revealing outfits, are at higher risk for anxiety and eating disorders. Many of the women who work in these restaurants are college students.