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New Survey Examines Barriers to Women Dropouts Returning to College to Earn Their Degrees

New Survey Examines Barriers to Women Dropouts Returning to College to Earn Their Degrees

A new study published by the American Women’s College at Bay Path University in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, reveals that 76 million adult women in the United States do not have a bachelor’s degree. Many of those 76 million women had started their educational journey, but were unable to graduate as a result of various life factors.

Study Led by University of Massachusetts Scholars Examines Contraceptive Use in Developing Nations

Study Led by University of Massachusetts Scholars Examines Contraceptive Use in Developing Nations

The results of the analysis showed that among women of reproductive age who are married or in a relationship in the world’s 69 poorest countries, only 45.7 percent used modern contraceptive methods. The study did find significant increases in contraceptive use in many African nations over the past five years.

How Two-Year and Four-Year Colleges Differ on Sexual Assault Prevention Efforts

How Two-Year and Four-Year Colleges Differ on Sexual Assault Prevention Efforts

A new report from EVERFI, the large educational technology company, examines the differences between community colleges and four-year institutions in how they deal with issues of drug and alcohol abuse, sexual misconduct and sexual assault, and mental health issues.

Study Finds Sexual Assault Rates Are Higher in the General Population Than on College Campuses

Study Finds Sexual Assault Rates Are Higher in the General Population Than on College Campuses

A new study by researchers at the University of Michigan finds that one in four women in the United States will experience forced intercourse by the time they’re 44 years old. But women who have no or little college education are 2.5 times as likely to have experienced forced sexual intercourse than women with a four-year college education.

In Medical Research, Gender Differences Are Explored More Often When Women Are on the Research Team

In Medical Research, Gender Differences Are Explored More Often When Women Are on the Research Team

A new study conducted by researchers at Stanford University in California and Aarhus University in Denmark, finds that when women participate in the publication of a medical research paper, the research is significantly more likely to deal with gender differences in the way people react to diseases and treatments.

Study Examines Why College Men Engage in Unwanted Sex With Women

Study Examines Why College Men Engage in Unwanted Sex With Women

Author Jessie Ford says that “men are motivated to have unwanted sex through a process where they try to avoid embarrassing themselves or their partner and seek to behave in interpretable ways. In particular, men consent to unwanted sex because accepting all opportunities for sexual activity is a widely accepted way to perform masculinity.”

Mentoring Programs May Be the Best Way to Retain Women in Geoscience Disciplines

Mentoring Programs May Be the Best Way to Retain Women in Geoscience Disciplines

A new study by researchers at seven universities finds that faculty mentorship is the most important factor in retaining women in geoscience disciplines. The programs can expand a student’s network of support by connecting them with people, particularly other women, they view as role models.

New Census Data Shows the Changing Makeup of American Families

New Census Data Shows the Changing Makeup of American Families

Married-couple families make up 69 percent of all families with children in 2017. In 1950, married couple families were 93 percent of all families with children. Over a quarter of married-couple families in 2017 had a stay-at-home mother. Only 1 percent had a stay-at-home father.

Wayne State University Study Shows Little Progress for Women in Michigan's Top Public Corporations

Wayne State University Study Shows Little Progress for Women in Michigan’s Top Public Corporations

A new study by faculty members at the Ilitch School of Business at Wayne State University in Detroit finds that women hold a small percentage of leadership positions at the 100 largest public corporations in Michigan. For example, women are only 9 percent of the highest-paid executives at these public companies.

Are Women College Students Shortchanged by Their Parents?

Are Women College Students Shortchanged by Their Parents?

Two studies show that parents save more for the higher education of boy children and give higher levels of financial assistance for college to their male children than they do for their female children.

Two State Universities Report Progress in Closing the Gender Pay Gap for Faculty

Two State Universities Report Progress in Closing the Gender Pay Gap for Faculty

Studies at Colorado State University and the University of Massachusetts at Amherst find that when men and women teach in the same field for the same amount of time at the same rank, there is no statistically significant difference in pay.

Women Making Huge Advances in Research Grants at the University of California, San Diego

Women Making Huge Advances in Research Grants at the University of California, San Diego

In 2013 women were the principal investigators on grant programs that amounted to $24.5 million. In contrast, men led grants totaling $133.3 million. In 2017, women were the principal investigators on grants totaling $89.1 million, while men led grant programs totaling $72.5 million.

Study Examines the Hiring and Retention Rates of Women Faculty in STEM Disciplines

Study Examines the Hiring and Retention Rates of Women Faculty in STEM Disciplines

Among the findings were that female engineering faculty who started as assistant professors were more likely to leave than men, and left without tenure more frequently than men. Time to promotion from associate to full professor took one to two years longer, on average, for women in biological, biomedical and agricultural fields.

Study Finds a Gender Gap in Publication Rates of Ph.D. Students

Study Finds a Gender Gap in Publication Rates of Ph.D. Students

A new study by researchers at Indiana University, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Illinois found that doctoral students who are men tended to publish more papers than doctoral students who are women. The pattern was particularly true in STEM fields.

The Gender Pay Gap for Physicists In and Outside the Academic World

The Gender Pay Gap for Physicists In and Outside the Academic World

The study found that for all physics faculty members and for women who hold physics Ph.D.s but work in the private sector, women earned, on average 18 percent less than male physics faculty. When all credentials are equal, women physicists still earn 6 percent less than men.

Testing Practices May Be Driving Women Out of Some STEM Disciplines, Study Finds

Testing Practices May Be Driving Women Out of Some STEM Disciplines, Study Finds

A new study led by Cissy J. Ballen of the University of Minnesota and Shima Salehi of Stanford University, found that women students in introductory biology courses performed worse on average than men on high-stakes examinations but better on other types of assessments, such as lab work and written assignments.

Report Finds That 79 Percent of Public Schools Reported Zero Incidents of Sexual Harassment

Report Finds That 79 Percent of Public Schools Reported Zero Incidents of Sexual Harassment

Despite the evidence that there is large spread sexual harassment in schools, the American Association of University Women report finds that 79 percent of all schools nationwide reported zero incidents of sexual harassment to authorities. The report concludes that “this outcome is statistically impossible.”

Research Shows That Faculty Search Committees Consider Relationship Status of Women But Not Men

Research Shows That Faculty Search Committees Consider Relationship Status of Women But Not Men

A new study by Lauren A. Rivera, an associate professor at Northwestern University, found that faculty search committee members assumed that heterosexual women whose partners held academic or high-status jobs were not “movable” and therefore excluded them from job offers.

Investors Show Gender Bias Against the Advice of Women Professionals

Investors Show Gender Bias Against the Advice of Women Professionals

A new study by researchers at the Yale School of Management and Columbia Business School finds that the advice given by women in investment positions to clients is not valued as high as advice given by male investment professionals.

Study Finds Higher Breast Cancer Risk for Women in Far Western Regions of Time Zones

Study Finds Higher Breast Cancer Risk for Women in Far Western Regions of Time Zones

Many people in the eastern regions of time zones awaken from a night’s sleep after sunrise. But people in the western region may get up at the same time on the clock to start their day, but it is dark when they get up. This is a disruption in their natural circadian rhythm. Circadian disruption has been found to be a probable human carcinogen.

Study Finds Better Outcomes for Patients Who Are Cared for by Women Surgeons

Study Finds Better Outcomes for Patients Who Are Cared for by Women Surgeons

A new study by a male doctor finds that patients treated by a woman surgeon have a small but statistically significant decrease in 30-day mortality rates as well as better results on measures such as length of hospital stay, complications, and readmission.

Why Women Could Make Firefighting Safer for All Firefighters

Why Women Could Make Firefighting Safer for All Firefighters

A new study by researchers at the Center for Firefighter Injury Research & Safety Trends at Drexel University in Philadelphia, finds incorporating new ideas from women can improve safety in traditionally male fire departments, but the hypermasculine culture in some can make female firefighters feel unwelcome and less likely to share their ideas.

Researchers Document Why Sexual Harassment Is Rampant in Anthropological Field Work

Researchers Document Why Sexual Harassment Is Rampant in Anthropological Field Work

The new study found that field site directors who failed to establish clear ground rules for the behavior of their team also were more likely to tolerate, ignore – or in some cases, engage in and encourage – the physical and/or sexual harassment of some members of their team.

Research Team Using Artificial Intelligence to Reduce False Positive Diagnoses of Breast Cancer

Research Team Using Artificial Intelligence to Reduce False Positive Diagnoses of Breast Cancer

False positives result from lesions that appear suspicious on mammograms and these lesions often have abnormal cells when tested by biopsy. As a result, patients undergo surgery to remove the lesion. But in 90 percent of the cases the lesions are benign.

Georgetown University Study Examines Why Women Transfer Out of STEM Majors

Georgetown University Study Examines Why Women Transfer Out of STEM Majors

The study found that women who are threatened by the prospect of low grades, are in fields with a low number of women peers, and are subjected to stereotypes that they are unlikely to succeed, are likely to switch majors. Only when all three factors are present are women likely to transfer to another field, according to the research.

Women Continue to Hold a Large Lead in Seeking Access to Higher Education

Women Continue to Hold a Large Lead in Seeking Access to Higher Education

New data from the U.S. Department of Education shows that women still are seeking to access higher education at rates far higher than men. In 2016, 5,829,088 women applied to four-year colleges and universities in the United States, compared to 4,504,453 men.

Why the Gender Makeup of the Nursing Profession Is Changing

Why the Gender Makeup of the Nursing Profession Is Changing

The study, published by the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and authored by economists at the University of Notre Dame and the University of Louisville, finds that from 1960 to 2013, the percentage of men among all registered nurses rose from 2.2 percent to 13 percent.

Study Finds That Highly Educated New Parents Do Not Equally Share Household Chores

Study Finds That Highly Educated New Parents Do Not Equally Share Household Chores

In the study of highly educated, two-earner couples who were having their first child, men spent about twice the amount of time engaged in leisure activities as their spouse in the period three months after the birth of their child.

The Gender Gap in Graduate Degree Awards Varies Greatly by Particular Discipline

The Gender Gap in Graduate Degree Awards Varies Greatly by Particular Discipline

Women made up more than three quarters of all master’s degree recipients in education, public administration, and the health sciences. However women were less than one third of all master’s degree recipients in engineering and mathematics and computer science. There were similar gender gaps in doctoral awards.

Careers of Women Faculty Members Are Burdened by "Academic Housekeeping" Chores

Careers of Women Faculty Members Are Burdened by “Academic Housekeeping” Chores

Research by Cassandra Guarino, professor of education and public policy at the University of California, Riverside, finds that women faculty members continue to disproportionately serve on committees and handle departmental administrative duties.

Rutgers University Scholar Examining Whether There Are Gender Differences in Concussions

Rutgers University Scholar Examining Whether There Are Gender Differences in Concussions

Carrie Esopenko, an assistant professor in the department of rehabilitation and movement science at Rutgers University in New Jersey is conducting research on whether there are gender differences in concussions, recovery time from such injuries, and the psychological effects of concussions on women.

Examining the Data on Enrollments of Women in U.S. Graduate Schools

Examining the Data on Enrollments of Women in U.S. Graduate Schools

A new report from the Council on Graduate Schools finds that in 2016 there were 1,045,500 women students enrolled in U.S. graduate schools. They made up 57.5 percent of all enrollments. But women were less than 40 percent of all graduate students in engineering, mathematics and computer science, and physical sciences.

Women Are Making Progress at Schools With Large Numbers of STEM Graduates

Women Are Making Progress at Schools With Large Numbers of STEM Graduates

A new study by the labor market analytics firm Emsi and published in The Wall Street Journal finds that at nine of the 10 universities with the largest number of degree earners in STEM fields, women made gains from 2012 to 2016. At six of these 10 schools women earned at least one third of all STEM degrees.

New Report Examines the Status of Single Mothers in Higher Education

New Report Examines the Status of Single Mothers in Higher Education

The number of single mothers enrolled in high education is growing both in absolute numbers and in their percentage of the total student population. However, these women face significant financial obstacles as well as time constraints that make it difficult for them to persist in higher education.

New Data on Poverty in the United States Shows a Continuing Gender Gap

New Data on Poverty in the United States Shows a Continuing Gender Gap

In 2016, 14.8 percent of all women and girls in the United States lived in poverty. For all males, the poverty rate was 12.2 percent. The good news is that the poverty rate for women and girls dropped from 16.3 percent in 2012 to 14.8 percent in 2016.