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A Significant Safety Issue: Women Firefighters Who Work in Gear Designed for Men

A Significant Safety Issue: Women Firefighters Who Work in Gear Designed for Men

A study by Meredith McQuerry, an assistant professor in the Jim Moran College of Entrepreneurship at Florida State University, finds that due to the fact that most firefighters’ gear is designed for men, women firefighters are hampered in their ability to perform their jobs under dangerous circumstances. Because of that mismatch, the suits don’t fit […]

Study Finds Sexual Harassment Increases as Women Move Up the Corporate Ladder

Study Finds Sexual Harassment Increases as Women Move Up the Corporate Ladder

The authors found that women supervisors are between 30 to 100 percent more likely to have been sexually harassed in the last 12 months than women workers generally. Among supervisors, the risk is larger in lower- and mid-level positions of leadership and when subordinates are mostly male.

International Study Finds That Women Are Underrepresented as First Authors in Medical Research

International Study Finds That Women Are Underrepresented as First Authors in Medical Research

Women published fewer articles, were more often affiliated with institutions in the Western world, and were more likely to publish qualitative studies rather than systematic reviews or experiments. They also found that women were less likely to publish research on clinical trials.

Research Finds That Attractive Women Face a Disadvantage When Applying for Traditional Male Jobs

Research Finds That Attractive Women Face a Disadvantage When Applying for Traditional Male Jobs

The “beauty is beastly” effect suggests that when attractive women apply for masculine jobs in which attractiveness is not relevant, they are hindered by their beauty — particularly in comparison to unattractive women.

Study Finds a Widespread Gender Gap in Self-Promotion That May Impact Hiring Decisions and Promotions

Study Finds a Widespread Gender Gap in Self-Promotion That May Impact Hiring Decisions and Promotions

A study by Christine Exley of Harvard Business School and Judd Kessler of The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania finds that when employers are looking at self-performance reviews, they are more likely to hire those who rate themselves higher. And men tend to rate themselves higher than women.

The Gender Gap in Finance Faculty Positions at the Leading Business Schools in the United States

The Gender Gap in Finance Faculty Positions at the Leading Business Schools in the United States

According to a new study by scholars at the University of Massachusetts and Yale University, women hold just 16 percent of faculty positions in finance at top U.S. business schools. Women faculty members were less likely to be tenured, are paid less, and tended to be more likely to hold positions at lower-ranked business schools.

New Book Examines the Issue of Sexual Consent on College Campuses

New Book Examines the Issue of Sexual Consent on College Campuses

The research included interviews of a large group of students as part of the Sexual Health Initiative to Foster Transformation initiative at Columbia University in New York City. The research was conducted by Jennifer S. Hirsch, a professor of sociomedical sciences, and Shamus Khan, a professor of sociology at Columbia University.

Study Finds Paid Family Leave Is Effective in Getting College-Educated Women to Return to the Workforce

Study Finds Paid Family Leave Is Effective in Getting College-Educated Women to Return to the Workforce

A new study conducted by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research finds that states that have implemented paid leave policies found a 20 percent reduction in the number of women leaving their jobs in the first year after welcoming a child, and up to a 50 percent reduction after five years. The effect was even more pronounced for college-educated women.

AAUW Report Documents the Long-Lasting Negative Impact of Workplace Sexual Harassment

AAUW Report Documents the Long-Lasting Negative Impact of Workplace Sexual Harassment

A new report from the American Association of University Women finds that the vast majority of women have been subjected to sexual harassment in the workplace. Furthermore, women who have been victimized face long-term consequences that can affect their careers, their health, their economic well-being, and the rest of their lives.

Study Finds That After a Period of Unemployment, Men Are More Likely to Consider Traditional Female Jobs

Study Finds That After a Period of Unemployment, Men Are More Likely to Consider Traditional Female Jobs

The researchers found that when men take jobs traditionally held by women, their wages increase, on average, by 4 percent from their previous employment and their occupational prestige also increases. Men who eventually find new employment in male-dominated or mixed-gender fields either maintain past levels or lose ground in these areas.

Mothers Shown to Be More Concerned When Boys Play With Girls' Toys Than When Girls Play With Boys' Toys

Mothers Shown to Be More Concerned When Boys Play With Girls’ Toys Than When Girls Play With Boys’ Toys

Brain regions involved in mentalizing or storage of social knowledge, understanding goal-directed behavior, behavioral control, and conflict monitoring were activated when viewing child targets that violated gender expectations. This was particularly true when mothers observed boys playing with traditional girls’ toys.

Study Finds That Male Authors of Scientific Papers Tend to Hype Their Own Work More Than Women Authors

Study Finds That Male Authors of Scientific Papers Tend to Hype Their Own Work More Than Women Authors

Researchers found that articles where the lead or senior author was a man, were 22 percent more likely than articles where the lead or senior author was a woman to use language in the abstract calling their findings using such words as significant, unique, unprecedented, prominent, and noteworthy.

Women College Students More Likely to Suffer Concussions Than Their Male Peers

Women College Students More Likely to Suffer Concussions Than Their Male Peers

A new study authored by three researchers at the University of Colorado presents some interesting data on concussions suffered by U.S. college students. A majority of all concussions were not suffered by varsity athletes and women were more likely to suffer concussions than male students.

Women From Underrepresented Groups Get Snubbed in Offers to Present at a Major Earth Science Conference

Women From Underrepresented Groups Get Snubbed in Offers to Present at a Major Earth Science Conference

The study found that at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union women from ethnic minorities were invited to give fewer talks, invited to give talks less often, and opted for poster presentations more than researchers who were not from underrepresented minorities.

The Gender Gap in Medical School Enrollments Is Widening in Women's Favor

The Gender Gap in Medical School Enrollments Is Widening in Women’s Favor

For the past four years, women’s enrollments in U.S. medical schools have increased by at least 3 percent annually. During the same time period, the enrollment of men has declined slightly. Since 2010, the number of women enrolled in medical school is up 25.5 percent. For men, the increase has been 10.8 percent.

Study Finds That Student Athletes Are a Disproportionate Percentage of Campus Sexual Offenders

Study Finds That Student Athletes Are a Disproportionate Percentage of Campus Sexual Offenders

The study by the USA Today Network found that student athletes make up about 3 percent of total enrollments but were 9 percent of the student disciplined for sexual misconduct. Football players account for only 1 percent of total enrollments but were 6 percent of all students disciplined for sexual misconduct.

The Gender Gap in Student Enrollments at American Law Schools

The Gender Gap in Student Enrollments at American Law Schools

The American Bar Association has compiled and published enrollment and degree completion data for its member law schools. Statistics show that in juris doctorate degree programs, women are a majority of students at 125 of the 202 American law schools.

The Gender Gap in College Participation Rates

The Gender Gap in College Participation Rates

In October 2018, there were 13,421,000 women between the ages of 18 and 24 in the United States. Of these, 50.2 percent were enrolled in postsecondary education. For men in this age group, 44.7 percent were enrolled in postsecondary education. A similar college participation gap existed for 2018 high school graduates.

Why Do Women Choose College Majors With Lower Earnings Potential Than Men?

Why Do Women Choose College Majors With Lower Earnings Potential Than Men?

The study by Natasha Quadlin, a sociologist at Ohio State University, found that when men and women both prioritize economic returns in their preferences for a major, men still choose majors that pay more. But even when men and women prioritized other preferences for their major – such as helping people – men still chose higher-paying majors.

Harvard Medical School Study Ties Societal Gender Inequality to Perceptual Bias Against Women

Harvard Medical School Study Ties Societal Gender Inequality to Perceptual Bias Against Women

The authors suggest that men living in countries with low gender equality are prone to cognitive “lumping” that obscures individual differences. The effect is similar to earlier research that shows that people tend to overlook interpersonal variations in the faces of people from races other than their own.

A Snapshot of the Gender Gap in Educational Enrollments in the United States

A Snapshot of the Gender Gap in Educational Enrollments in the United States

In October 2018, there were 8,373,000 men enrolled in higher education compared to 10,534,000 women. Thus, women made up 56 percent of all enrollments in higher education. Women made up nearly 60 percent of total enrollments in U.S. graduate schools.

Study Finds That Adding Women to Corporate Boards Leads to a Decline in Market Value

Study Finds That Adding Women to Corporate Boards Leads to a Decline in Market Value

A new study by two women scholars at the INSEAD business school in Fontainebleau, France, finds that when U.S. corporations put a woman on their board of directors, they tend to show a decline in market value over the next two years. The appointments are seen as “diversity hires” by investors and not in the interest of maximizing share value.

Can Women "Have It All?" Study Looks at Gender Equality in the Workplace and Happiness at Home

Can Women “Have It All?” Study Looks at Gender Equality in the Workplace and Happiness at Home

A study authored by Mihaela Pintea, associate professor of economics at Florida International University in Miami, finds that society is making it more financially rewarding for women to enter the workforce, and is slowly eroding the norms that prevent them from doing it.

Stanford University's Faculty Quality of Life Survey Reveals a Gender Gap in Satisfaction Levels

Stanford University’s Faculty Quality of Life Survey Reveals a Gender Gap in Satisfaction Levels

Stanford’s women faculty members responded less positively than their male colleagues across all areas addressed in the survey. The greatest differences can be found in concerns related to their scholarship and their experiences with discrimination and harassment.

Study Finds a Persistent Gender Pay Gap in Federal Scientific Departments and Agencies

Study Finds a Persistent Gender Pay Gap in Federal Scientific Departments and Agencies

The results showed that in the agencies based on physical sciences and engineering – the sciences culturally framed as more masculine – the researchers found that more of the pay gap can be attributed to inequalities within jobs, or “within-job discrimination,” so that men are paid more than women in the exact same jobs at the same agency locations. I

Women Who Suffer From PTSD Are Twice as Likely as Other Women to Develop Ovarian Cancer

Women Who Suffer From PTSD Are Twice as Likely as Other Women to Develop Ovarian Cancer

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer and the fifth-most-common cause of cancer-related death among U.S. women. Studies in animal models have shown that stress and stress hormones can accelerate ovarian tumor growth, and that chronic stress can result in larger and more invasive tumors.

Study Finds No Biological Gender Differences in Brain Function of Children Regarding Mathematics

Study Finds No Biological Gender Differences in Brain Function of Children Regarding Mathematics

The research team used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the brain activity in a group of young children ages 3 to 10 while the children were watching an educational video covering early math topics. After numerous statistical comparisons, the research team found no difference in the brain development of girls and boys.

Study Finds That 1 of Every 16 Women's First Sexual Encounters Was Rape or Otherwise Forced

Study Finds That 1 of Every 16 Women’s First Sexual Encounters Was Rape or Otherwise Forced

A new study led by researchers at Harvard Medical School finds that one of every 16 women’s first sexual encounter was forced. Furthermore, the study found that forced sexual initiation appeared to be associated with multiple adverse reproductive, gynecologic, and general health outcomes later in life.

Women Are Two-Thirds of All U.S. College and University Students Who Study Abroad

Women Are Two-Thirds of All U.S. College and University Students Who Study Abroad

The data shows that during the 2017-18 academic year, 341,751 American students went abroad to engage in academic pursuits at foreign colleges and universities. Of these, 67 percent were women.

Study Offers a Roadmap to Reduce Bias and Increase the Number of Women in STEM Research

Study Offers a Roadmap to Reduce Bias and Increase the Number of Women in STEM Research

Last December a group of 23 scientists met at the Banbury Center in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, to discuss ways to reduce bias and increase the number of women in STEM research positions. Their findings were recently released in a paper published in Science magazine.

Women Underrepresented on the Editorial Boards of Major Journals in Statistics and Biostatistics

Women Underrepresented on the Editorial Boards of Major Journals in Statistics and Biostatistics

A new study by Andrea Foulkes a professor of mathematics and statistics at Mount Holyoke College in South Hadley, Massachusetts, finds that women comprise less than a quarter of editorial board members on prestigious journals in statistics and biostatistics.

Addressing the Lack of Women in Leadership Positions in Academic Pediatrics

Addressing the Lack of Women in Leadership Positions in Academic Pediatrics

in 2017, women were 35 percent of all physicians in the United States but 63 percent of all pediatricians. Women made up 57 percent of all medical school faculty in pediatrics but were just 35 percent of all full professors in pediatrics and 26 percent of pediatric department chairs.

Report Examines the Power Gap in Leadership Positions in Massachusetts Higher Education

Report Examines the Power Gap in Leadership Positions in Massachusetts Higher Education

The report found that while women are a majority of college students in the state, only 37 percent of college and university presidents in the state are women. And the gender gap is even more pronounced at the state’s major universities.

The Gender Gap in Household Income in the United States Remains Large

The Gender Gap in Household Income in the United States Remains Large

The median income of households headed by a single woman in the United States in 2018 was $45,128. For households headed by a single man in 2018, the median income figure was $61,518. For married-couple families, the median income was $93,684.

Woman's Philanthropy Institute Looks at Nonprofits Dedicated to Women and Girls

Woman’s Philanthropy Institute Looks at Nonprofits Dedicated to Women and Girls

The index identified 45,000 U.S. charities that are dedicated to serving primarily women and girls. In 2016, these organizations received a collective total of $6.3 billion in charitable contributions from individuals, foundations, and corporations. This was about 1.6 percent of all donations.