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Gender Differences in Test Scores on the ACT College Entrance Examination

Gender Differences in Test Scores on the ACT College Entrance Examination

For the high school Class of 2021, the average score for women who took the ACT college entrance examination was 20.6. For men, the average score was 20.3. Women had higher scores than men in reading and English, but men had slightly higher scores than women in mathematics and science.

Women's Enrollments in Graduate School Held Steady After the Onset of the Pandemic

Women’s Enrollments in Graduate School Held Steady After the Onset of the Pandemic

New data from the Council on Graduate Schools women shows women were only 29.3 percent of all first-time graduate students in engineering. Women were 33.6 percent of all first-time graduate students in mathematics and computer science, down from 34.6 percent in 2019.

Study Shows How Evaluators' Gender Biases Can Be Reduced

Study Shows How Evaluators’ Gender Biases Can Be Reduced

In ratings on Yelp, women restaurant servers were more likely than men to receive just one star in approval ratings and were less likely than men to get the highest five-star rating. But the authors found that among Yelp reviewers who had received an “Elite” designation, the gender gap in their reviews became smaller.

Evidence That Women's Scholarly Production Was Slowed More Than Men During the Early Pandemic

Evidence That Women’s Scholarly Production Was Slowed More Than Men During the Early Pandemic

The analysis of more than 63,000 manuscripts submitted to 11 leading biomedical journals found that prior to the pandemic women were 46 percent of first authors on papers submitted to these journals. Women were 37.1 percent of first authors for COVID-related manuscripts during the pandemic but only 29.4 percent of the authors during the initial six months of the global crisis.

The Lack of Gender Diversity in Climate Change Research

The Lack of Gender Diversity in Climate Change Research

Several recent studies have shown that women are only a small percentage of the leading researchers in climate change, according to the number of published research appears and citations of published scholarly work.

Women Archaeologists Negatively Impacted by the Pandemic More Than Their Male Peers

Women Archaeologists Negatively Impacted by the Pandemic More Than Their Male Peers

A new study led by Julie Hoggarth, an associate professor of anthropology at Baylor University in Waco, Texas, surveyed a large group of professional archaeologists on their experiences of job loss; economic, workload, research and training impacts; and changes in personal responsibilities after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Study Finds Girls Are Alienated From Politics at an Early Age

Study Finds Girls Are Alienated From Politics at an Early Age

Students in grades 1 to 6 were given the task of drawing a political leader. Of the 1,604 students in the study, 66 percent drew a man as the primary political leader but only 13 percent depicted a woman. Of note, male political leaders dominated the drawings of students regardless of sex.

Social Inclusion of Women by Male Colleagues in STEM Fields Can Improve Their Workplace Experience

Social Inclusion of Women by Male Colleagues in STEM Fields Can Improve Their Workplace Experience

Surveys of 1,247 professional scientists and engineers from nine organizations, found that even a small amount of social inclusion of women by male colleagues can go a long way toward reducing the gender barriers experienced by women in STEM fields.

Study Finds an Inverse Relationship Between Breastfeeding Length and Risk of Postpartum Depression

Study Finds an Inverse Relationship Between Breastfeeding Length and Risk of Postpartum Depression

A new study of 29,685 women living in 26 states led by Christine Toledo an assistant professor in the College of Nursing at Florida Atlantic University, finds that as the number of weeks new mothers breastfeed their infants increase, the lower their risk for postpartum depression.

The Expanding Gender Gap in Poverty Rates in the United States

The Expanding Gender Gap in Poverty Rates in the United States

The gender gap in poverty rates expanded in the year in which the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged the U.S. economy. There were more than 10.1 million women and girls who lived in families where their incomes were less than one half of the official poverty rate. There were just 7.8 million men who lived in these conditions of severe poverty.

Study Finds That Women Often Do Not Receive the Credit They Deserve for Academic Scholarship

Study Finds That Women Often Do Not Receive the Credit They Deserve for Academic Scholarship

According to the study of more than 5,500 researchers in multiple fields, women were significantly more likely than men to report disagreements about who was named on a paper and in the order of authorship. The researchers found this to be particularly true in natural sciences and engineering.

Do Non-Tenured Women Faculty Inflate Grades More Than Men to Increase Their Chance of Retention?

Do Non-Tenured Women Faculty Inflate Grades More Than Men to Increase Their Chance of Retention?

The findings indicate that students are more likely to receive higher grades when they take classes with female instructors who hold positions with more contract uncertainty (temporary or pre-tenure) than if the instructor is tenured, but that there is little to no difference in grades received across faculty rank of male instructors.

Census Bureau Reports on the Gender Gap in Median Income and Earnings From Work in 2020

Census Bureau Reports on the Gender Gap in Median Income and Earnings From Work in 2020

In 2020, the median income level for family households headed by a single woman was 73.1 percent of the median income for family households headed by a single man and 48.5 percent of the median income of married-couple families. Both of these income gaps narrowed slightly from the previous year in 2019.

Study Finds Managers Rate Women's Performance High but Their Potential Low

Study Finds Managers Rate Women’s Performance High but Their Potential Low

The analysis by scholars at the University of Minnesota, MIT, and Yale University, found that women are 14 percent less likely to be promoted at the company in each year, and that a major factor preventing women from being promoted is that they are consistently judged as having lower leadership potential than men.

The Pandemic Widened the Gender Gap in Higher Education Enrollments

The Pandemic Widened the Gender Gap in Higher Education Enrollments

There were 11,350,777 women students enrolled in higher education last fall. In the fall of 2019, there were 11,274,609 women enrolled. Thus, enrollments of women were up slightly. In contrast, there were 8,004,350 men enrolled in high education in the fall of 2020, A year, earlier, 8,362,890 men were enrolled. Thus, while women’s enrollments were up, the enrollments of men dropped by 4.3 percent.

College-Educated Women Are Increasingly Having Babies Before Marriage

College-Educated Women Are Increasingly Having Babies Before Marriage

A new study authored by Andrew Cherlin, a sociologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, finds that in 1996, only 4 percent of college-educated women in their 30s had their first babies while unmarried. Twenty years later, that percentage has increased six-fold to 24.5 percent.

The Gender Gap in Online Learning Has Narrowed During the Pandemic

The Gender Gap in Online Learning Has Narrowed During the Pandemic

Coursera, Inc., one of the largest online learning platforms in the world, released a new study that found that women in the United States are learning online at higher rates compared to the pre-pandemic period, representing 52 percent of new learners in 2021, up from 47 percent in 2019. Women enrollments in online STEM courses increased from 35 percent to 42 percent.

How Marriage, Parenting, and Issue of Work-Life Balance Impact Women Academics' Publication Rates

How Marriage, Parenting, and Issue of Work-Life Balance Impact Women Academics’ Publication Rates

A new study led by Elaine Howard Ecklund, who holds the Herbert S. Autrey chair in social sciences at Rice University in Houston, Texas, found that parenting, marriage, and the strain of maintaining a work-family balance are all factors for women’s success in publishing. But there were differences by global region and academic discipline.

Differences in Educational and Employment Histories of Men and Women College Graduates a Decade Later

Differences in Educational and Employment Histories of Men and Women College Graduates a Decade Later

The study found that a decade after graduating from college, more than 28 percent of women went on to earn a master’s degree compared to 24.5 percent of men. Women were slightly less likely than men to have earned a research doctorate or a professional degree. Men, on average, earned $20,000 more per year than women.

Study Finds Gender Differences in College Student Stress Levels and Coping Mechanisms

Study Finds Gender Differences in College Student Stress Levels and Coping Mechanisms

Overall, women indicated higher levels of stress than their male counterparts. Gender differences were evident in both coping dimensions and individual coping strategies used. Women were found to utilize the emotion-focused coping dimension and endorsed the use of four coping strategies more often than males. These included self-distraction, emotional support, instrumental support, and venting.

Do Merit-Based Pay Systems Reduce the Gender Compensation Gap?

Do Merit-Based Pay Systems Reduce the Gender Compensation Gap?

A new study led by Eunmi Mun, an assistant professor of labor and employment relations at the University of Illinois, finds that rather than reducing gender-based pay inequality by limiting managers’ reliance on factors such as gender bias and favoritism, a shift to performance bonuses and other meritocratic employment practices may actually widen the gap by preserving the status quo.

Mothers May Face a Higher Level of Job Discrimination Than Other Women

Mothers May Face a Higher Level of Job Discrimination Than Other Women

According to author Patrick Ishizuka, a sociologist at Washington University in St. Louis, discrimination against mothers likely results from conflict between the perceived time commitments necessary to be a “good mother” and an ideal worker. Whereas many professional and managerial workers are expected to work all the time, low-wage service workers are increasingly expected to work at any time.

Virginia Tech Study Finds Gender Differences in Fears About the COVID-19 Pandemic

Virginia Tech Study Finds Gender Differences in Fears About the COVID-19 Pandemic

A new study by researchers at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University finds that women express more fear than men over the health aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic, despite the fact that men are more likely to die from complications of the virus. Men worry more than women over the economic impact of the pandemic.

Northeastern University Study Examines Gender Differences in Physician Burnout Rates

Northeastern University Study Examines Gender Differences in Physician Burnout Rates

Researchers examined data from 43 studies on physician burnout conducted between 2010 and 2019. The results showed that women physicians experience burnout more often and to a greater degree than men. In almost 90 percent of studies that compared burnout by gender, female physician samples reported higher burnout prevalence, particularly in the form of emotional exhaustion.

Is the Gender Wage Gap Due to Women's Lack of Assertiveness in Negotiations?

Is the Gender Wage Gap Due to Women’s Lack of Assertiveness in Negotiations?

A recent study led by Denise L. Reyes, a new assistant professor of psychology at the University of Houston, comes to the conclusion that the salary gap between men and women may be due to certain personality traits, specifically – assertiveness. 

Has the 21st-Century Economy Produced a Change in Marriage Patterns in the United States?

Has the 21st-Century Economy Produced a Change in Marriage Patterns in the United States?

According to new research led by University of Wisconsin­–Madison professor of sociology Christine Schwartz, the tendency of people to marry those with similar jobs has not changed much over the past half century. Due especially to the increased representation of women in professional jobs, dual-professional marriages have become by far the most common coupling.

University of Minnesota Research Finds Eating Disorders Affect Women in All Socioeconomic Groups

University of Minnesota Research Finds Eating Disorders Affect Women in All Socioeconomic Groups

Many people have the impression that eating disorders mainly affect White girls and women from middle and high-income families. But new research from scholars at the University of Minnesota finds that binge eating and use of unhealthy weight control behaviors are prevalent among young people from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds.

In the Field of Communication, Women's Scholarship Is Cited Less Often Than the Work of Men

In the Field of Communication, Women’s Scholarship Is Cited Less Often Than the Work of Men

The analysis, led by researchers at the Annenberg School of Education at the University of Pennsylvania, showed that papers by men were over-cited and papers by women were under-cited relative to the citation rates you would expect if references were drawn randomly and gender was not affecting citation practices.

University of Virginia Study Examines Gender Differences in Recovery Time for Student-Athlete Concussions

University of Virginia Study Examines Gender Differences in Recovery Time for Student-Athlete Concussions

The researchers found female student-athletes at the University of Virginia typically took six days to recover from a concussion, while male athletes took 11 days. Women were found to report a possible concussion to athletic trainers more quickly than men.

Women Still Vastly Underrepresented in Clinical Trials for Cardiovascular Drug Research

Women Still Vastly Underrepresented in Clinical Trials for Cardiovascular Drug Research

A new study, led by Leslie Cho, the director of the Cleveland Clinic’s Women’s Cardiovascular Center, has found that women remain underrepresented in cardiovascular drug and device clinical trials despite guidelines and legal requirements developed almost 30 years ago to ensure broader inclusivity.

Women Academics Are Likely to Feel Like Imposters in Fields Regarded as Needing "Brilliance" to Succeed

Women Academics Are Likely to Feel Like Imposters in Fields Regarded as Needing “Brilliance” to Succeed

A new study led by psychologists at New York University finds that the more an academic discipline is perceived to require raw talent or “brilliance” for success, the more both women and early-career academics feel professionally inadequate — like “impostors”. This is particularly true for women from racial or ethnic groups underrepresented in these fields.

Report Finds Glaring Gender Disparities in NCAA Division I Basketball Tournaments

Report Finds Glaring Gender Disparities in NCAA Division I Basketball Tournaments

The report from an independent law firm found that “the experience of the women’s tournament participants was markedly different from and inferior to that of the men’s tournament participants. The NCAA’s organizational structure and culture prioritize men’s basketball, contributing to gender inequity . . . in large part because the vast majority of the NCAA’s current revenue comes from men’s basketball.”

Study Examines How Religion Impacts the Gender Pay Gap in the United States and Worldwide

Study Examines How Religion Impacts the Gender Pay Gap in the United States and Worldwide

A study by Traci Sitzmann, a professor of management at the University of Colorado Denver and Elizabeth Campbell an assistant professor in the School of Management at the University of Minnesota, finds that religion may be a significant factor in the worldwide gender pay gap. They also found that the wage gap is lower in the more secular states in the U.S.

The College Majors With the Widest Gender Disparities in Degree Attainments

The College Majors With the Widest Gender Disparities in Degree Attainments

The major with the great gender disparity is early childhood education. Women make up 96.2 percent of the majors in the field. Women also make up 90 percent or more of all majors in family studies and elementary education. In computer engineering, men make up 87.4 percent of all majors, the highest percentage favoring men among all the disciplines studied.

In Sports Betting, Women Bet Less Than Men But Have More Success

In Sports Betting, Women Bet Less Than Men But Have More Success

A recent study found that men accounted for 57 percent of all bettors but 72 percent of all dollars spent on sports betting in the United States. Furthermore, the authors found that 29.7 percent of male bettors placed more than $500 in sports bets per month, but only 12.2 percent of women bettors did.